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John Flatt

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We photographers all fall generally into three categories: 'happy-snappers' 'naturalists' and 'creatives'.

The groups are not mutually exclusive...

Many of us specialise, others prefer to generalise.

 

My friend and fellow photographer, Michelle Stokie, blurs the lines between realistic and creative.

Series One. Gone shearing...

Series Two. Unreal naturalism...

Series Three. Strikingly creative...

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"a creative never stands still"

orever Explorin

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Those "happy-snap" days

As I was growing up my parents never had a camera. They saw no need for one and besides cameras were expensive. Suddenly, somehow at some stage, I remember a box brownie. I don't know who got. It was just there. But photos had to be snapped (only on special occasions) until the roll of film was filled; taking months or even longer. Then the roll was removed from the camera, placed in the provided packaging and taken to the local chemist (or later - Camera House) for processing. A week or two thereafter we collected the envelope containing the printed photos (initially black and white); not remembering what photos had been taken and not knowing whether they would be blurred, ghosted white or even legible. I can understand mum-n-dad not taking a lot of photos; too many failures. In time I got my own camera only to soon realise it was an expensive hobby. I gave it away.

As pay-days passed and my bank balance improved, I experimented with 35mm transparencies (a box containing thousands of memories is still tucked away in a cupboard waiting for that time-in-retirement when I will have a surplus of time in which to transfer the captured images to my PC), then a Sony 8mm video camera and finally a quality Pentax (still with negatives and paper prints). Developments saw me at a later stage progress through a series of digital cameras; each getting more and more elaborate. I became an enthusiastic amateur photographer.

However, it wasn't until my sixties that I was introduced to the mind-blowing world of photo-editing. It was after joining a U3A photographers group that I underwent a personal paradigm shift in thinking; the concept of post-photography editing changed everything. Thus I entered the world of creative photography where images could not only be improved and modified but creatively changed... Magic!

 

As I progressed though the LightSeekers (a Geelong Camera club special-interest group), I was introduced to real 'creatives'; thus coming to realise the potential of digital photography. I finally developed the confidence to leave the group and focus more on my own interests; writing /creating / self-publishing / web-site development. My next leap occurred as I moved into smart-phone photography; particularly when, at one LightSeekers session, I threw  out the challenge  - separate the DSLR and iPhone  photos. A task that could not be done consistently - even by these knowledgeable enthusiasts.

"Them was me 'happy-snappin' days," says I.

 

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Post-U3A days...

My discovery of editing software and smartphone photography

 

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Personal Explorations...

 

 

Bing!

My Bing collection of desktop images is always inspiring.

While the photographs are totally real and naturalistic, enhanced editing has been masterfully achieved; thus achieving immediate recognition and maximum impact. This has not involved great changes to the physicality of the image which I think remains true to the original scene fronting the photographer.

Oh, to be able to view the world through such eyes...

 

 

 

 

 

To watch:

  • a delightful video-gallery of Bing images click here.

     Sit back, relax and enjoy.

  • an inspiring Bing-image collection click here.

     This allows the isolation of images for closer examination

View at 720p and maximum size